Jeopardy Tournaments

As of March, 2009, Jeopardy Tournaments secured the rights to produce Jeopardy Tournaments anywhere in the state of California, for educational purposes only. We need to hear from interested schools in OTHER STATES in an effort to attempt to secure the rights to produce your Jeopardy Tournaments after the 2009-2010 school year.

SCHOOLS, DISTRICTS & COLLEGES: JeopardyTournaments.com will come to your campus and produce a full-scale Jeopardy Tournament. (see VIDEO GLIMPSE) With your cooperation, we will schedule all games in specific venues (classrooms, auditorium, etc.), and, if needed, we will supply screening test material to decide who may participate. Further, we will create all game content* for preliminary, semi-final, and final rounds. We will provide scoring podiums for the championship round in your auditorium or similar facility.

Dependent upon scheduling, Brad Rutter, Bob Harris, or Nancy Zerg (view videos on Testimonials Page) may be available to host your school’s championship game through Jeopardy Tournaments. See their bios and comments on our HOME page.

*Game content provided to us by your school’s teachers via tests, notes, etc., will help to defray the overall costs for individual tournaments, also making your tournament more pertinent to your school.

What are YOU looking for? Please click on the appropriate link to see how your tournament would work:
Middle School/Junior High | High School | College | Elementary School

Middle School/Junior High
Normally, this involves 6th, 7th, and 8th grades, but can be adjusted for your needs. It’s important, however, that you understand Jeopardy Tournaments work in groups of 3, which is perfect for the 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade format. If your school is 7th and 8th grades only, consider working with and including a 6th-grade class of a nearby school.

The number of students who could play at each grade level would be determined by the size of your school, as well as your budget. To establish who would play, a Jeopardy Qualifier (JQ) could be administered to each grade level. The JQ is a fill-the-blanks test that could literally cover anything. If you want 18 students to play at each grade level, the top 18 scores on the JQ are in. Or the top 27, if you want that many in each level. It’s that simple.

A typical First Round would have 18 to 27 participants at each grade level. Again, notice that all is divisible by 3. For the sake of clarity, we’ll use 18 players per grade level as the example. Those 18 would be randomly divided into 6 groups of 3 players each.

Ideally, those 6 groups would play their First Round games at the same time in 6 different rooms. By playing the “same game” in each room, your school would save on the cost of creating a multitude of games. One game fits all. After one game on one day, students would advance to the Semi-Final Round the next day.

A typical Semi-Final Round would involve 3 more games of 3 players each. This presents a mathematical problem for the 18-player scenario since there would only be 6 First Round winners. This is addressed the same way it’s done on the Jeopardy! TV show. The 6 winners advance, but so do the students with the top 3 non-winning scores.

The Championship Round should be a special day at your school. On this day Jeopardy Tournaments will have your auditorium’s stage looking like the real Jeopardy! TV show, with scoring podiums, a host podium, and a big screen for the audience to view all of the clues. The 6th-Grade Championship game would be played first, followed by the 7th and 8th-Grade Championship games. Then, after lunch, those 3 champions would compete for the coveted School Championship.

Jeopardy Tournaments can run everything listed above. To save costs, however, your staff could create and run the First and Semi-Final Rounds, leaving just the production of the Championships to Jeopardy Tournaments. Or, we can format your tournament however you would want.

All you need to do is CONTACT US.

Tournament Pricing
Due to many variables (i.e., distance from Long Beach, transportation of equipment, housing, number of games needed, advance time, etc.,) pricing for each tournament produced by Jeopardy Tournaments will be negotiated individually with school officials. If your school would like to bring in Brad Rutter, Bob Harris, or Nancy Zerg, (view videos on Testimonials Page), their costs will also be negotiated individually. Jeopardy Tournaments will serve as the mediator in those negotiations.

To Cover Tournament Expenses
If a Jeopardy Tournament is of interest to your school or district, but your available funds are tight, you may want to consider a couple of alternatives to help cover the expenses. First, you could possibly approach your school’s PTA. Next, a fundraiser specifically for such a tournament might help a lot. Then, of course, there are school corporate or individual sponsors who could have their name or names attached to your tournament.

High School
Normally, this involves 10th, 11th, and 12th grades, but can be adjusted for your needs. It’s important, however, that you understand Jeopardy Tournaments work in groups of 3, which is perfect for the 10th, 11th, and 12th-grade format, allowing your 9th-grade students a great deal of anticipation for playing in the 10th grade.

The number of students who could play at each grade level would be determined by the size of your school, as well as your budget. To establish who would play, a Jeopardy Qualifier (JQ) could be administered to each grade level. The JQ is a fill-the-blanks test that could literally cover anything. If you want 18 students to play at each grade level, the top 18 scores on the JQ are in. Or the top 27, if you want that many in each level. It’s that simple.

A typical First Round would have 18 to 27 participants at each grade level. Again, notice that all is divisible by 3. For the sake of clarity, we’ll use 18 players per grade level as the example. Those 18 would be randomly divided into 6 groups of 3 players each.

Ideally, those 6 groups would play their First Round games at the same time in 6 different rooms. By playing the “same game” in each room, your school would save on the cost of creating a multitude of games. One game fits all. After one game on one day, students would advance to the Semi-Final Round the next day.

A typical Semi-Final Round would involve 3 more games of 3 players each. This presents a mathematical problem for the 18-player scenario since there would only be 6 First Round winners. This is addressed the same way it’s done on the Jeopardy! TV show. The 6 winners advance, but so do the students with the top 3 non-winning scores.

The Championship Round should be a special day at your school. On this day Jeopardy Tournaments will have your auditorium’s stage looking like the real Jeopardy! TV show, with scoring podiums, a host podium, and a big screen for the audience to view all of the clues. The 10th-Grade Championship game would be played first, followed by the 11h and 12th-Grade Championship games. Then, after lunch, those 3 champions would return for the coveted School Championship.

Jeopardy Tournaments can run everything listed above. To save costs, however, your staff could create and run the First and Semi-Final Rounds, leaving just the production of the Championships to Jeopardy Tournaments. Or, we can format your tournament however you would want.

All you need to do is CONTACT US.

Tournament Pricing
Due to many variables (i.e., distance from Long Beach, transportation of equipment, housing, number of games needed, advance time, etc.,) pricing for each tournament produced by Jeopardy Tournaments will be negotiated individually with school officials. If your school would like to bring in Brad Rutter, Bob Harris, or Nancy Zerg, (view videos on Testimonials Page) their costs will also be negotiated individually. Jeopardy Tournaments will serve as the mediator in those negotiations.

To Cover Tournament Expenses
If a Jeopardy Tournament is of interest to your school or district, but your available funds are tight, you may want to consider a couple of alternatives to help cover the expenses. First, you could possibly approach your school’s PTA. Next, a fundraiser specifically for such a tournament might help a lot. Then, of course, there are school corporate or individual sponsors who could have their name or names attached to your tournament.

College
Ideally, this would involve Seniors, Juniors, and Sophomores, but can be adjusted for your needs. It’s important, however, that you understand Jeopardy Tournaments work in groups of 3, which is perfect for the Senior/Junior/Sophomore format.

The number of students who could play at each grade level would be determined by the size of your school, as well as your budget. To establish who would play, a Jeopardy Qualifier (JQ) could be administered to each grade level. The JQ is a fill-the-blanks test that could literally cover anything. If you want 18 students to play at each grade level, the top 18 scores on the JQ are in. Or the top 27, if you want that many in each level. It’s that simple.

A typical First Round would have 18 to 27 participants at each grade level. Again, notice that all is divisible by 3. For the sake of clarity, we’ll use 18 players per grade level as the example. Those 18 would be randomly divided into 6 groups of 3 players each.

Ideally, those 6 groups would play their First Round games at the same time in 6 different rooms. By playing the “same game” in each room, your school would save on the cost of creating a multitude of games. One game fits all. After one game on one day, students would advance to the Semi-Final Round the next day.

A typical Semi-Final Round would involve 3 more games of 3 players each. This presents a mathematical problem for the 18-player scenario since there would only be 6 First Round winners. This is addressed the same way it’s done on the Jeopardy! TV show. The 6 winners advance, but so do the students with the top 3 non-winning scores.

The Championship Round should be a special day on your campus. On this day Jeopardy Tournaments will have your auditorium’s stage looking like the real Jeopardy! TV show, with scoring podiums, a host podium, and a big screen for the audience to view all of the clues. The Sophomore Championship game would be played first, followed by the Junior and Senior Championship games. Then, after lunch, those 3 champions would return for the coveted School Championship.

Jeopardy Tournaments can run everything listed above. To save costs, however, your staff could create and run the First and Semi-Final Rounds, leaving just the production of the Championships to Jeopardy Tournaments. Or, we can format your tournament however you would want.

All you need to do is CONTACT US.

Tournament Pricing
Due to many variables (i.e., distance from Long Beach, transportation of equipment, housing, number of games needed, advance time, etc.,) pricing for each tournament produced by Jeopardy Tournaments will be negotiated individually with school officials. If your school would like to bring in Brad Rutter, Bob Harris, or Nancy Zerg, (view videos on Testimonials Page) their costs will also be negotiated individually. Jeopardy Tournaments will serve as the mediator in those negotiations.

To Cover Tournament Expenses
If a Jeopardy Tournament is of interest to your school or district, but your available funds are tight, you may want to consider a couple of alternatives to help cover the expenses. First, you could possibly approach your school’s PTA. Next, a fundraiser specifically for such a tournament might help a lot. Then, of course, there are school corporate or individual sponsors who could have their name or names attached to your tournament.

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Elementary School
Normally, this involves 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades, but can be adjusted for your needs. It’s important, however, that you understand Jeopardy Tournaments work in groups of 3, which is perfect for the 3rd, 4th, and 5th-grade format.

The number of students who could play at each grade level would be determined by the size of your school, as well as your budget. To establish who would play, a Jeopardy Qualifier (JQ) could be administered to each grade level. The JQ is a fill-the-blanks test that could literally cover anything. If you want 18 students to play at each grade level, the top 18 scores on the JQ are in. Or the top 27, if you want that many in each level. It’s that simple.

A typical First Round would have 18 to 27 participants at each grade level. Again, notice that all is divisible by 3. For the sake of clarity, we’ll use 18 players per grade level as the example. Those 18 would be randomly divided into 6 groups of 3 players each.

Ideally, those 6 groups would play their First Round games at the same time in 6 different rooms. By playing the “same game” in each room, your school would save on the cost of creating a multitude of games. One game fits all. After one game on one day, students would advance to the Semi-Final Round the next day.

A typical Semi-Final Round would involve 3 more games of 3 players each. This presents a mathematical problem for the 18-player scenario since there would only be 6 First Round winners. This is addressed the same way it’s done on the Jeopardy! TV show. The 6 winners advance, but so do the students with the top 3 non-winning scores.

The Championship Round should be a special day at your school. On this day Jeopardy Tournaments will have your auditorium’s stage looking like the real Jeopardy! TV show, with scoring podiums, a host podium, and a big screen for the audience to view all of the clues. The 3rd-Grade Championship game would be played first, followed by the 4th and 5th-Grade Championship games. At the middle and high schools, their 3 champions would return for the coveted School Championship in the afternoon. Because of the age levels, this is not recommended for the elementary grades.

Jeopardy Tournaments can run everything listed above. To save costs, however, your staff could create and run the First and Semi-Final Rounds, leaving just the production of the Championships to Jeopardy Tournaments. Or, we can format your tournament however you would want.

All you need to do is CONTACT US.

The Costs
Due to many variables (i.e., distance from Long Beach, transportation of equipment, housing, number of games needed, advance time, etc.,) pricing for each tournament produced by Jeopardy Tournaments will be negotiated individually with school officials. If your school would like to bring in Brad Rutter, Bob Harris, or Nancy Zerg, (view videos on Testimonials Page) their costs will also be negotiated individually. Jeopardy Tournaments will serve as the mediator in those negotiations.

To Cover Tournament Expenses
If a Jeopardy Tournament is of interest to your school or district, but your available funds are tight, you may want to consider a couple of alternatives to help cover the expenses. First, you could possibly approach your school’s PTA. Next, a fundraiser specifically for such a tournament might help a lot. Then, of course, there are school corporate or individual sponsors who could have their name or names attached to your tournament.